New Tastes & Techniques: Heirloom Tomato Sandwich

This is the first post in a series that highlights new tastes and techniques, which will feature delicious things that are new to me and I think are of value to other home cooks to consider. Of course, you may already know about such things. If that is the case, please share your twist on these favorite recent discoveries!

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Peak summer heirloom tomatoes from the St. Paul Farmer’s Market

Melissa Clark inspired me to think about the best way to approach a tomato sandwich last year, and it was one of the best things I had last year that was new to me. Tomatoes that grow in the north are very special. The quality and availability of summer produce started to peak in Minnesota a few weeks ago. This means heirloom tomatoes are in season and are abundant. During a recent trip to the St. Paul Farmer’s Market, at least a half dozen farmers offered heirloom tomatoes. I remember a few years ago when arriving early and knowing who had what was necessary to get the best tomatoes. Or any heirloom tomatoes. We bought a pile from four producers who we known for at least a few years. One tomato was ready for a sandwich the day we purchased it and the rest were ready within three or four days. The sandwich pictured below used a tomato from Mhonpaj’s Garden.

As my cooking evolves, simplicity has become increasingly important. It is very easy, and flavorful, to hide behind a robust ancho and paprika based rub but it is more satisfying to complement and intensify the flavors of featured ingredients instead of competing with them.

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This version of the sandwich allows the main ingredients to shine and involves acidity (the perfect tomato that is enhanced with layers of salt), which dances with something tangy (pickled red onions or ramps), and is supported by flavorful fats (a thin layer of Dynasty Thai Hot Chili Mayonnaise and great olive oil, ). These flavors combine and overtake two slices of Levain bread from Patisserie 46. The bread is spongy, absorbent, and has a crust that stands up to the messy goodness while the interior yields to the crushed tomato, oil and mayo, and acid from the pickled ramps or red onions.

The tomato sandwich is so simple it doesn’t really need a recipe.  However, here are two versions that are worthy of consideration:

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  1. If you are lucky enough to have pickled ramps: spread a thin layer of thai mayonnaise on the bottom layer of the bread, stack layers of very ripe heirloom tomatoes while sprinkling with a little salt and drizzling with the most fabulous olive oil you have. Crush the tomatoes with the back of a spoon as you go to release some juices. When the stack is high enough that you can barely get your mouth around it, top with pickled ramps. Slice in two and enjoy the messy goodness.
  2. If you are not lucky enough to have pickled ramps, follow the above instructions until you have a piece of bread with stacked tomatoes drizzled with olive oil. Rub some crushed garlic into the top piece of bread and cover the tomatoes with pickled onions. This one inspired enough tomato lust that I didn’t think to take a picture until the sandwich was long gone.

What to do with the rest of the tomatoes? Try gazpacho (chop everything by hand for the best flavor and use a little sherry vinegar) and go for the simplest version of sliced tomatoes with a little salt, great olive oil and a few leaves of basil that is complemented with a small piece of grilled meat.

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Tomato Sandwich Adapted from Melissa Clark

 

 

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