Stock – Whole Animal Series (I wish that I had duck feet)

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During a great conversation with Lenny Russo a few years ago, when he was hosting Lidia Bastianich, we chatted about some of his tips for home cooks. He really urged making stocks and cooking simply with the great flavors of the Midwest. He loves duck stock, and emphasized finding duck feet for the base of the stock due to their level of collagen with a few carcasses for the best flavor. This conversation stuck with me, and if you get to know a duck producer you may be able to get your hands on some really nice duck feet. Having home made stock in the freezer makes me feel more connected to my cooking, and I was thrilled when my young daughter developed a stock habit. Initially it may feel a little weird to have a freezer full of bones, and may take a little explaining to guests searching for a bottle of vodka, but this is absolutely part of the adventure.

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Recently I had a stock day where my freezer was emptied of mushroom parts, chicken, duck and lamb carcasses. I decided to also make beef stock and Jonny Hunter of Lowry Hill Meats kindly sold me a beef leg cut to order. Butcher shops that purchase whole animals are worth seeking out because of the flexibility in what they can cut for you on the spot.

My basic stock recipe is to roast bones for ~30 minutes at 400 degrees and then bring a healthy amount of aromatics to a simmer with the bones. Heavier meats like beef and lamb could use a bit of tomato paste in the roasting process to bring out flavor. Aromatics could include onions (with skin), celery, leeks & fennel – especially with birds, some carrots but not too many to keep stocked balanced, a few whole black pepper cloves, a few bay leaves, parsley and/or thyme. Sometimes I will add some chicken wings and lamb necks to the stock, and sometimes I just use the bones.

Since this is the whole animal series, this round of stock started with whole duck carcasses from Bar 5 Meats. I have found that poultry stock needs 4-6 hours, lamb stock needs 6-8 hours and beef stock could go 10+ hours. If you really get serious you could use a large pressure cooker. Strain it through cheese cloth and a strainer and allow it to cool – you may use an iced water bath if you like – prior to freezing for future use. I tend to store my stock three ways in the freezer: ice cube tray sized portions,  pint sized portions, and heavily reduced portions that I can spoon out and add water to for a quick pan sauce.

My favorite non-meat stock is mushroom stock, and I save stems, clippings from interesting mushrooms that don’t quite make the cut as meal worthy, and dried mushrooms. 30 minutes in the pressure cooker with aromatics does the job. I like leeks, a little garlic, some white onion, and thyme as my aromatics but you can really use a wide variety. Just maintain a balance, and don’t use too much of something with a strong flavor.

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Homemade stock in the freezer is the secret weapon of a home cook, especially in the North where we rely on soups, stews, sauces, and braises for much of the year. Our two year old daughter is also a big fan, and “soup” was her favorite food group this past winter.

 

 

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