Beet Salad Three Ways

This post combines the larder, fermentation, simple oven roasted beets, and a few other finds.

IMG_1895.JPGBeets are an amazing vegetable with many uses: thinly shredded to complement a salad, sautéed greens for a side dish, and roasted beets that can be their own salad. A salad featuring beets can be transformed to something amazing with a couple of beet preparations. A mixture of red and orange beets adds a lot of pop to a plate.

Fermented beets: I shredded some beets and fresh horseradish, a black radish and and salt. This all went in a very clean mason jar and sat on the counter for about a week with a very loose lid. It did bubble over a few times…. (You could also use shredded beets that aren’t fermented.) The Wedge Table often has fermentation classes, and Sandor Katz’s Wild Fermentation is a go-to print resource.

Pickled beets: There are a lot of pickling recipes on the Internet, and beets are one of the few things I prefer to pickle for long term storage versus refrigerator pickle to be able to always have them on hand. Traditional pickling (some people call it canning but that isn’t quite accurate) leaves cucumbers and red onions – two staples in our house – a little soggy for my taste.

Roasted beets: I will typically wrap them in foil and put them in the oven until they are soft. When I am using my Big Green Egg I will also throw them on when smoking something or even cook them afterwards as the grill maintains its temperature for at least an hour after putting out the fire.

The dressing is about two parts olive oil to one part vinegar with a little salt and pepper. I use a sherry vinegar and a fully flavored olive oil but almost anything will add its own flavor.

Micro greens are a lot of fun. They add color, a little flavor, and a lot of pop to a dish. When I can find them I like Weed’s Greens.

Whenever I am in Midtown Global Market – often to attend a cooking class featuring a local chef at Kitchen in the Market – I usually stop by Salty Tart for bread and or treats as well as Grassroots Gourmet. One of the best things Grassroots Gourmet has is Marieke Gouda from Wisconsin. Nettled and truffled gouda are some of my favorites. This time a thin slice of the nettled gouda is nested on top of the beets and dressing.

Presentation is important, especially with vegetables. Slicing, layering, and making sure that everything is placed on the plate  on a way that is visually appealing. That’s about it.

 

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